Saxophones Models:

Special Note: From 1947-1950 Sterling Silver Bell option was added to Saxophones. For more information on Silver Bells Click Here.

King C Soprano No. 1001 "Straight Model"

Introduced around 1916-1920.

 

King Bb Soprano No. 1003 "Curved Model"

Introduced around 1916-1920. This model commands top dollar on e-bay.

 

King Eb Alto No. 1004 "Solo Instrument"

Introduced around 1916-1920.

King C Melody No. 1005 "All Purpose"

Introduced around 1916-1920. This was the most popular saxophone to play if you were an amateur. The C Melody was very "user-friendly" and could be played without complicated transposition of sheet music. As the saxophone evolved, the C Melody became mostly a beginner saxophone. With King, the C Melody would continue to be manufactured thru the 1930's under the "Cleveland" and "American Standard" brands.

King Bb Tenor No. 1006

Introduced around 1916-1920.

King Eb Baritone No. 1007

Introduced around 1916-1920.

 

King Saxello Soprano No. 1000

Put into production in late 1924 the Saxello (with stand) was a major departure from the "Straight" Soprano. The Saxello was the first patent application (U.S. Patent 1549101, granted November 2, 1926) for saxophones sought by The H. N. White Company. By 1932 with the great depression, production of the Saxello ended.

 

King "Voll-True" Eb Alto No. 1004 (22 Times Better)

Around 1930-1932 The New King "Voll-True" Alto Saxophone replaced the Alto No. 1004 "Solo Instrument" Saxophone.

 

King "Voll-True II" Eb Alto No. 1004 (Quicker Action)

Around 1933-1934 The New King "Voll-True II" Alto Saxophone replaced the first "Voll-True."This saxophone offered entirely new D keys with a roller on the G key which enables you to move easily from G to B natural and Bb.

 

King "Voll-True II" Bb Tenor No. 1006 (Perfect Intonation)

Around 1933-1934 The New King "Voll-True II" Tenor Saxophone was introduced replacing the first No. 1006

 

King "Voll-True II" Eb Baritone No. 1007 (Code word Gump)

Around 1933-1934 The New King "Voll-True II" Baritone Saxophone was introduced replacing the first No. 1007.

 

King New "Zephyr" Model Eb Alto No. 1004 (Smoothness)

Around 1936-1937 The King New "Zephyr" Model Eb Alto was introduced and replaced the "Voll-True II" No. 1004.

 

King New "Zephyr" Model Bb Tenor No. 1006 (Modernistic)

Around 1936-1937 The King New "Zephyr" Model Bb Tenor was introduced and replaced the "Voll-True II" No. 1006.

 

King New "Zephyr" Model Eb Baritone No. 1007

Around 1936-1937 The King New "Zephyr" Model Eb Baritone was introduced and replaced the "Voll-True II" No. 1007.

 

The Zephyr "Special" Tenor No. 1006-B

Around 1939-1940 The Zephyr "Special" Model Tenor was introduced and did not replace The Zephyr but was one step up. This saxophone had a sterling silver mouth pipe and was the pre cursor to the Super 20.

 

The Zephyr "Special" Alto No. 1004-B

Around 1939-1940 The Zephyr "Special" Model Alto was introduced and did not replace The Zephyr but was one step up. This saxophone had a sterling silver mouth pipe and was the pre cursor to the Super 20.

 

The New King "Super-20" Eb Alto No. 1014

Around 1945-1947 The King "Super-20" Alto was introduced and replaced the Zephyer "Special" No. 1004-B. The "Super-20" featured a 20 point improvement over the "Zephyr" such as an accelerated octave key. Later models featured option of a Silver Bell called "Silversonic." For more information on Silver Bells Click Here.

 

The New King "Super-20" Bb Tenor No. 1016

Around 1945-1947 The King "Super-20" Tenor was introduced and replaced the Zephyer "Special" No. 1006-B. The "Super-20" featured a 20 point improvement over the "Zephyr" such as an accelerated octave key. Later models featured option of a Silver Bell called "Silversonic." For more information on Silver Bells Click Here.

Special Features of the "Super-20"

The New King "Super-20" Eb Baritone No. 1017

Production was started around 1960.

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If you can provide more accurate saxophone information please contact me.

All the information on this page is compiled by King Catalogs and should be used accordingly.